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July 2006

Dear Friends,
            Hello all! This newsletter has two very important pieces of information for you!!
1. There is new and easy way to raise money for Silent Witness just by searching the Internet with GoodSearch.com.
It's simple. You use GoodSearch.com like any other search engine — the site is powered by Yahoo! — but each time you do, money is generated for Silent Witness.
Last year, search engines generated close to $6 billion in revenue from advertisers. With GoodSearch part of this advertising revenue will now be directed to Silent Witness.
We hope that not only will you use GoodSearch as your main search engine from here on out, but will also pass this message on to your friends and family. The more people who use this, the more money will go to Silent Witness.
2. We need to make a new database with the names of the women you are using in your exhibits. PLEASE help us with this, we would really appreciate it. I have attached a questionnaire about your exhibit. We would like to make a database so that when people would like to start an exhibit we already have the names of people to use and if the state coordinators change we will have a central location for the database. We would also love to be able to tell family members when they talk to us if their names are being used and where they are used. Thank you in advanced for you help. We really appreciate it!!
            I would love for you to send me updates on where you are displaying the silhouettes and other ways you are making a difference and ending domestic homicide! Please email me any stories or press releases that you have! I love to add them to the newsletter! Silentwitness2010@gmail.com         

I would like to welcome our new newsletter subscribers:


Tina

Hammack

Uniontown

PA

Tim

Soxman

Uniontown

PA

Kristine

Clever

Rochester

MI

Joan

Knies

Jasper

IN

Leslie

Monaghan

   

Julie

Creighton

Charlotte

NC

Wendy

Brown

Halifax

Canada

Lena

Harding

Springfield

MO

Lora

Jenkins

Fuquay-Varina

NC

Chris

Ledman

Iowa City

Iowa

 PLEASE HELP WE NEED COORDINATORS FOR THE FOLLOWING STATES:

Nevada
New Mexico
Ohio
Utah
Vermont
Wisconsin
Alabama
Hawaii
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky

We now have an official job description:
The state coordinator keeps track of who in the state have exhibits. Some coordinators have regular correspondence, usually by email, with the groups. They are the contact person for someone who would like to start a new exhibit. They share the shield stories they already have in order to help people not repeat the work that was already done. Some may recruit new SW exhibits as well. Some may coordinate the donating and borrowing of an exhibit for people to use across the state. Some sponsor an event in October for everyone to come to, but others just publicize the events of others. They also keep in touch with us by email or phone to let us know what is happening, keep us up on emerging issues, ask for advice or other things they needed. This may take two to three hours a week in email correspondence. During busier times it may be up to four or five hours.

As you can see we still need many more coordinators! I know that there are people who help and loan exhibits across the state automatically so it would be great to get the information out there for everyone.

NEWS FROM THE STATES and COUNTRIES:

Nebraska:
From Patricia Perez:
Domestic violence programs strained across  Nebraska
 
By JOSH FUNK 
  
 OMAHA, Neb. - Omaha's two domestic violence shelters are  filled, and programs designed to help victims statewide sometimes struggle  to meet the need.

Leaders of law enforcement agencies that prosecute offenders and the Omaha charities that combat domestic violence said Wednesday the community's help is needed to address the issue because victims need encouragement to leave abusive relationships.

Catholic Charities runs a 23-bed domestic violence shelter that serves Omaha, and Heartland Family Service runs a 22-bed shelter that serves Sarpy and Cass counties. Both are at capacity.

"We turn away about 1,900 requests for admission a year," said Scot Adams, executive director of Catholic Charities of Omaha.

Pete Tulipana, president and CEO of Heartland, said the counseling program and support groups his agency offers are also overflowing.

There might be a need for additional shelter space in Omaha, Adams said, but shelters are an expensive measure.

Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning said domestic violence is a problem statewide, and the charities that help victims are often short on money.

"They're perpetually underfunded, and perpetually stretched for resources," Bruning said.

The misery caused by domestic violence is so great that he said it's almost impossible to overfund the charities and agencies that deal with it.

Several prosecutors in Bruning's office do nothing but domestic violence cases, and when needed, his office helps county attorneys prosecute domestic violence cases.

Bruning mentioned his office's 2003 domestic assault prosecution of Deuel County Attorney Doug Palik as an example of how widespread the problem is.

"I think we're making strides, but there's a lot more to be done," Bruning said.

Karen Hadley, who leads Omaha's Domestic Violence Coordinating Council, said domestic violence also was linked to other crimes, including homicide.

"The recent homicides in Omaha are a tragic reminder that domestic violence is a serious social issue that affects every community," Hadley said.

Near the speakers at the news conference, a red silhouette of  a woman told the story of Laura Bandur, 39, who was killed by her  ex-husband in Omaha on May 4. Eric Bandur, 46, shot Laura Bandur and then himself.

The group plans to launch a campaign, called "The Silence Stops Here," to raise awareness about domestic violence.

Peg Harriott, executive director of the Omaha YWCA, said there are many reasons why women don't immediately leave abusive relationships.

She said anyone who knows someone in an abusive relationship should offer support by saying something like, "No one deserves to be abused" or "I am concerned about your health and safety."

A service of the Associated Press(AP)  

Loisiana:
From Linda Williamson:
We held our lst Speak Out Against Domestic Violence @ the Northgate Mall here in Lafayette, LA. It was sponsored by the Avon Foundation and Angels of Mercy taking a stand and not be silent! Prizes were given away along with information about the Avon's Foundation taking a stand with us for they opened the first Family Justice Center in New York City. It was awesome and they are determined to do it again! We will empower our community about domestic violence for it is on the rise here! We also had our Silent Witnesses with us! Linda

From Catalene B. Theriot:
            I have two silent witnesses in New Iberia, La. One stands by the court room
and the other in my office when victims want to sign drop charges, which we
do not drop. I display them around the courthouse during Crime Victim's week and in October

Rhode Island:
From Jennifer Stanley:
This was a very low key display that was set up in our campus library with information that students could take as well as a petition for them to sign.  I really love opportunities when we can use the Silent Witnesses to collaborate with other student groups to spread the word, open minds and raise awareness.
 Photo

World NEWS:

From the CAPEV update:
IN THE NEWS-- KANSAS GOVERNOR SIGNS BILL ALLOWING WORKPLACE PROTECTIONS FOR VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE OR SEXUAL ASSAULT

On May 25, Kansas Governor Kathleen Sebelius signed HB 2928.  The bill allows persons attempting to escape from actual or threatened domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking, or stalking to obtain a confidential address designated by the Secretary of State's office to be used as a substitute mailing address.

The bill also prohibits an employer from discharging or in any manner discriminating or retaliating against an employee who is a victim of domestic violence or a victim of sexual assault for taking time off from work to obtain or attempt to retain any relief, including seeking a restraining order or other injunctive relief, seeking medical attention for injuries caused by domestic violence or sexual assault, obtaining services from a domestic violence shelter, program or rape crisis center, or to settle matters, including but not limited to court appearances. To the extent allowed by law, the employer shall maintain the confidentiality of an employee requesting leave, as well as the confidentiality of any supporting documentation provided by the employee to the employer.

This bill takes effect January 1, 2007 after publication in the statute book.

IN OTHER NEWS -- VERMONT BECOMES SECOND STATE TO PROTECT PETS IN ABUSE CASES

Pets can be protected from domestic violence under a new law that makes Vermont the second state in the country to include pets in court orders. Governor James Douglas has signed a measure that permits judges to offer protection-from-abuse orders for pets owned by victims of domestic abuse.

"Violence to pets is often a tactic used by batterers to instill fear in and control over their victims," said Joanne Boourbeau, head of the Human Society's New England division. "Victims of domestic violence may be reluctant to leave an abusive relationship for fear of retaliation upon their pets. This legislation will give an extra layer of protection to domestic violence victims." Maine has a similar law and pet protection measures are being considered in New York and Illinois. Vermont's law goes into effect after Sept. 30. Violators face fines of up to $25,000 and prison time.

The Humane Society said studies show a link between domestic abuse and animal cruelty. The group has said "a history of animal abuse was found in 25 percent of aggressive male criminals, 30 percent of convicted child molesters, 36 percent of those who assaulted women and 46 percent of those convicted of sexual homicide." (Source:  Associated Press)

IN OTHER NEWS -- CHICAGO MAYOR’S OFFICEON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RELEASES HELPLINE HIGHLIGHTS

In 2005, there were 20,688 calls placed to the City of Chicago Domestic Violence Help Line by 17,071 callers.  The Help Line operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, is toll-free, confidential and multi-lingual.  To view highlights of the calls including a description of the victim callers within each zip code area in Chicago from reports titled “Zip Code Area-Profiles: Victim Callers 2005” and “2005 Highlights,” visit www.cityofchicago.org/domesticviolence.  Please feel free to print, photocopy, and share the resources on the site with others interested in the information.  You may also call Michelle Fugate, Ph.D., Coordinator of Research and Evaluation at the City of Chicago Mayor’s Office on Domestic Violence at 312-747-9972.

UPDATE -- MAN CONVICTED OF SETTING WIFE ON FIRE AT WORK SENTENCED TO LIFE IN PRISON
You may remember the case we’ve been following of Yvette Cade, whose estranged husband set her on fire at her T-Mobile workplace after Judge Richard A. Palumbo lifted a protective order against him. Roger B. Hargrave was convicted in April on all charges against him: attempted first-degree murder, attempted second-degree murder and assault. 
On June 2, he was sentenced to life in prison. He asked for forgiveness before his sentencing. "What I did was insane," Hargrave said. "Never did I intend to kill Yvette Cade." Hargrave, 34, had blamed substance abuse for his actions, but Judge William D. Missouri said Friday that Hargrave had made multiple trips through the criminal justice system with numerous chances to get help. Prosecutors said Hargrave walked into the cell phone store where Cade worked last year, poured liquid on her head from a soda bottle, then chased after her -- lighting a match when she fell to the ground.
Yvette Cade, 32, suffered burns to more than half her body and has undergone more than a dozen surgeries. She appeared on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in May, where she discussed the attack. She recited the Lord's Prayer when she took the stand Friday during the sentencing phase. “I know that Ray intended to kill me, the jury agreed, and today, with this sentence issued by the judge, I finally feel safe from him,” said Cade.
 
She was also critical of Palumbo when reading from a prepared statement in court. Palumbo has been accused of judicial misconduct for making disparaging remarks about women in similar cases. He has not been allowed to hear cases since October and the misconduct charges were filed last month. “I think we have to do more to protect people, usually women, who are vulnerable in these types of cases. The protective order issue in this case is a center piece of that,” said Glenn Ivy, Prince Georges County State’s Attorney. A public hearing is set for August. Palumbo denies any wrongdoing. He said the dismissal of the protective order in Cade's case was an administrative error.

Ms. Cade’s family has advocated for domestic violence legislation - including judicial training on domestic violence, and a national workplace resource center on domestic violence and sexual assault in cooperation with CAEPV Member Legal Momentum. (Sources:  Associated Press, NBC4 Maryland)

Never mistake knowledge for wisdom. One helps you make a living; the other
helps you make a life.  Sandra Carey

Sincerely,
Cassie Pritchard
Silentwitness2010@gmail.com
(405)744-1113

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